Eggs Build a Jewish Farmers’ Community – Toms River, New Jersey

welcome to toms river

courtesy tomsriver.org

It was early spring, 1910. Sam Kaufman owner of the biggest bar in Brooklyn was worried about his sick daughters. He knew he had to get them out of the stale New York City air. Perhaps he could buy a farm. But the Catskills, where he first looked, lacked schools and he had five daughters to educate. Then he learned of Toms River, near the sea in central New Jersey, 75 miles south of where he lived in Brooklyn. NY. Toms River had reasonably priced farmland, a small town atmosphere, only 800 inhabitants, but most importantly a good high school.

Sam Kaufman became the first Jewish farmer in Toms River. He grew corn, wheat, potatoes and peanuts and also had cows. But his great contributions to Jewish farming in Toms River were his chickens. He was the first farmer in the area to raise poultry. His initiative began the egg sales that became a mainstay of Toms River’s Jewish farmers. When in 1922 vitamin D was discovered and farmers learned that adding Vitamin D to chicken feed could greatly increase egg production, this line of business really took off. Some Toms River farmers were to own more than 7000 chickens. Continue reading

Southern Brazilian Jewish Farmers Tell Their Stories

Israelitas no Rio Grande do Sul

This post gives a description of the novels and memoirs left to us by Brazilian Jewish Colonization Association colonists. They offer fascinating portrayals of Jewish immigrant life. The post includes visuals, links to more information and a list of references, including how to find both the original and secondary works  in libraries worldwide.
Continue reading

Jewish Farmers in Connecticut

LisbonCT_AnsheiIsraelSynagogue

Anshei Israel Synagogue in Lisbon, Connecticut , built in 1936

In this post, videos, an interactive map and many references supplement a short history of Jewish farming communities in Connecticut.

Beginning as early as 1891, Baron Hirsch supported the settlement of Jewish farmers in Connecticut. By 1928 there were over 5000 Jewish farm families in the state. The Baron Hirsch Fund and its subsidiary the Jewish Agricultural Society (JAS) sponsored these projects. The projects continued throughout the first half of the 20th Century, helping not only the Russian Jews escaping pogroms in the first part of the century, but after WWII Holocaust survivors  as well.  Continue reading

Brazilian Jewish Farming Communities

Cemitério_Judaico_Quatro_Irmãos_Placa

Entrance to the Quatro Irmaos Farming Community Cemetery

This post contains a short history of the Brazilian communities and some references. Baron Hirsch established the Jewish Colonization Agency (JCA) in 1891 to “to assist and promote the emigration of Jews from any part of Europe or Asia… and to form and establish colonies in various parts of North and South America ….”. And during his lifetime the Agency supported farming communities for Eastern European Jewish immigrants in Argentina and Canada.

But after the Baron’s death in 1896, the new directors of the JCA decided to establish additional communiities in the extreme South of Brazil, near the city of Santa Maria in the State of Rio Grande do Sul. Continue reading

Why Jews Don’t Farm

This article ( see link below)  from a descendent of an immigrant to the Baron Hirsch farming community in Woodbine, New Jersey is fun to read.  But contrary to his thesis there were Jewish farming communities in the Ukraine and Bessarabia -probably other places too.  In fact before the assignation of Czar Alexander II in 1881, Jewish were allowed to and often encouraged to buy land in Russia for farming.

http://www.slate.com/articles/arts/everyday_economics/2003/06/why_jews_dont_farm.html